The Feminist Beauty Project

YOUR FEMINIST GUIDE TO LOVING AND CRITIQUING ALL THINGS BEAUTY SINCE 2015

WHY ARE THERE NO CHAMPIONS FOR ETHICS IN THE BEAUTY INDUSTRY?

BEAUTY, LIFESTYLEElizabeth NichinComment

Consuming less, living more intentionally, being more mindful, and curating higher quality, well-made goods.

Call it what you want: ethical, sustainable, conscious consumerism, minimalism, fewer better things. There are plenty of terms that we use.

I've sort of gotten swept up into this slow living movement. I have to admit--it's a really popular topic on blogs and You Tube as of late...and it is pretty addicting. Thanks, Marie Kondo! (This is an affiliate link; see below for more information.) And I've even talked a little bit about how this has seeped into my beauty routine lately.

Still, I think there has been a lot of focus on our clothing, on fast fashion, and on how we can be more ethical, sustainable, and conscious consumers when it comes to fashion.

I get it--we all need to wear clothes. Makeup and beauty products are more of an elective for some people. Changing how we buy our clothes can have a huge impact on the world if everyone listens. But the beauty industry is a major global force, too--and we shouldn't ignore that. In 2014, the global cosmetic market was valued at 460 billion (in USD).

That's huge.

We can't say that changing how we think about cosmetics and the beauty industry won't have an impact on the world--on labor, on the environment, and on our well-beings.

The bottom line is that with documentaries like The True Cost and blogging fads like minimalism and capsule wardrobes (I have to admit--my personal favorite is Capsules by Cladwell), people are paying more attention to the fashion industry. And consumers are asking more questions about fast fashion companies and the implications that fast fashion has on our lifestyles, on the planet, and on the people who are making our clothing.

This is a good thing.

And I'm all for it. I've been changing the way I consume clothing and think about my wardrobe, too.


BUT I'M STILL WONDERING: WHY DOESN'T THE BEAUTY INDUSTRY HAVE CHAMPIONS FOR ETHICS JUST LIKE THE FASHION INDUSTRY DOES?


Why is there no "true cost" of beauty? Why aren't there thousands of posts on beauty blogs about creating a capsule cosmetic collection? Why aren't we asking questions about who is making our mascara, and under what conditions? Why aren't we talking about how to make the beauty industry more sustainable for the environment? Why aren't we asking these questions and so many more?

It's time for us to start asking, and to start demanding the answers.

If we care about the food we eat and the clothes we wear, we should care just as much about what we put on our bodies. That means we need to ask questions about our mascara, our shampoo, and our toothpaste. Our nail polish and our cleaning products. Our deodorant and our lipstick. (Yes! Even our lipstick!)

I'm committed to being a champion for ethics in the beauty industry. Are you? Let me know down below!

 

in lipstick & solidarity,

e

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